Artists are putting their stamp on Chicago exhibitions to spread messages of human communication, global conservation, racial discrimination, and gender inequality through a variety of mediums with maximum style.

In her sculpture exhibition “Future Fossils: SUM” (Sept. 7 – Nov. 13), Chicago artist Lan Tuazon shows how the 109 tons of waste produced during a person’s lifetime could be repurposed into a functional home. Built to scale and exhibited inside the two-story gallery at the Hyde Park Art Center, Tuazon presents a one-bedroom house that is constructed solely with recovered materials.

To extend the lifespan of used objects, the artist dissects, layers, and presses them into a stratification-like form that mimics fossils. Visitors are invited to contribute by dropping off plastic items to be shredded on site, which will then be turned into raw materials for sheet press companies. “I had no idea how impactful her work would be on piloting new materials from recovered plastics. This immersive installation will truly put into perspective the geologic weight of our consumer habits, while literally building inhabitable structures from waste,” says Art Center Director of Exhibition & Residency Programs Allison Peters Quinn who curated the show.

In partnership with Chicago’s Department of Cultural Affairs and Special EventsArt on theMART will project works by conceptual artist Barbara Kruger (Sep. 17 – Nov. 25). The installation coincides with the Art Institute of Chicago’s presentation of “Thinking of You. I Mean Me. I Mean You.” (Sep. 19 – Jan 24), a comprehensive exhibition of Kruger’s output. “We are honored to feature the work of such a legendary contemporary artist on our platform,” says Cynthia Noble, Executive Director of Art on theMART. “With this installation, our site extends Kruger’s major retrospective beyond the museum walls and into the urban architectural environment, where the art is free and accessible to all. We are so pleased to collaborate with Kruger and the Art Institute on this significant alignment.”


“For more than four decades, the artist has been a consistent, critical observer of the ways in which images and words circulate through culture and more recently, the accelerated modes in which they inhabit our daily lives. At a time when dispersion has replaced distribution and memes rules the realm of visual information, her momentous installation will invite us to pay attention and carefully consider how we relate to one another,” adds Robyn Farrell, Associate Curator, Modern and Contemporary, Art Institute of Chicago.

Art Institute visitors can also view “Bisa Butler: Portraits” (through Sep. 6). This marks the first solo museum exhibition of the artist’s work which uses the traditionally marginalized medium of textiles and quilts to convey personal and historical narratives of the Black experience. “In my work I am telling the story — this African American side — of the American life,” says Butler. “History is the story of men and women, but the narrative is controlled by those who hold the pen.”

On Aug. 27, Hilton | Asmus Contemporary opens its doors for an opening event at 5 p.m. to kick off “Origins” — an exhibition of images by acclaimed National Geographic photographers/filmmakers Cristina Mittermeier and Paul Nicklen, both of whom are co-founders of Sea Legacy.

“The whole premise of Sea Legacy is that we’re experts at visual communication, and we’re going to be partnering with like-minded organizations that have the same mission that we do, to save the oceans,” explains Mittermeier. “The ocean is the largest ecosystem on our planet, and three billion people depend on coastal and marine resources.” As a ‘National Geographic Woman of Impact’, Mittermeier has worked in more than 100 countries on every continent to connect with an estimated 2.5 billion people about global climate change.

“We have decided to make 2021 our year of conservation. By this, I mean every single sale we make in our gallery this year will benefit a variety of conservation organizations, including organizations that support animals, oceans and other natural resources, in addition to our ongoing support of women’s and children’s causes,” says Arica Hilton, global advocate and Hilton | Asmus Contemporary founder. “Through the arts, Hilton | Asmus Contemporary is dedicated to making every single step and every breath we take, have a purpose. A global purpose. A higher purpose. We will be working with artists who search for solutions addressing the plight of our environment and the human condition.”

Paintings and mixed media works by Swedish artist Anna U Davis are showcased in “Reality Check” (through Nov. 28) at Chicago’s Swedish American Museum in Andersonville. The solo exhibition explores gender inequality, racial discrimination and climate change.

The Museum of Contemporary Art Chicago presents “Bani Abidi: The Man Who Talked Until He Disappeared” (Sep. 4 – June 5) showcasing nearly two decades of work by multidisciplinary Pakistani artist Bani Abidi. The artist uses her upbringing in Karachi and experiences while studying at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago to inform her work which satirically critiques those in power. Organized by Sharjah Art Foundation, the exhibition includes video, photography, sound, and installations that explore transcultural connections with humor.

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First image: Bisa Butler. The Safety Patrol, 2018. Cavigga Family Trust Fund. © Bisa Butler.

Second Image: Untitled (Truth), 2013, Digital image courtesy of Barbara Kruger. ©

Cristina_Mittermeier_Astrapia_Hilton_Asmus_Contemporary

PAUL NICKLEN 

Paul Nicklen (Canadian) is a visual artist and marine biologist who has documented both the beauty and the plight of our planet for over 20 years. Paul’s photography informs and connects by creating an emotional bond with wild subjects in extreme conditions.

After a 20-year career of photographing for journalistic publications like National Geographic, Paul’s perpetuating dream is to revisit his archives for the true artistic gems and release them to the world. His ongoing journey is to continue photographing intimate, evocative, powerful subject matter to create a thought-provoking body of work. Paul hopes his viewers look into the eyes of the animals in his photographs and fall in love with their vulnerability.

In addition to being one of the world’s most renowned nature photographers, Paul is a well-known speaker, TED Talks participant, author, and National Geographic Fellow. In the past two decades, Paul has collaborated with scientists, filmmakers, conservationists, and explorers to create awareness and inspire action for global issues such as climate change.

Paul has garnered more than 30 of the highest awards given to any photographer in his field, earning a global following of celebrities, conservationists, and fans.

CRISTINA MITTERMEIER

One of the most respected voices in conservation photography and one of the most influential female photographers in the world, Cristina Mittermeier began her career as a Marine Biologist working in her native Mexico.

For the past twenty-five years, she has dedicated herself to inspiring a global audience to care about the delicate balance between human well-being and healthy ecosystems.

Cristina’s work has exhibited at the Oceanographic Museum of Monaco, The Miller Gallery in Cincinnati, The Paul Nicklen Gallery in New York, Xposure in the UAE , Art Basel Miami, Terras de Salitre/Mar de Mares Festival in Santiago, The Museum of Plastic Pop-Up in New York, The United Nations Headquarters in association with Disney and Girl Up, and at Fotografiska in Stockholm, Sweden.

Cristina is the co-founder of SeaLegacy, the founder and former president of the International League of Conservation Photographers, a board member for the WILD Foundation, an advisor on two major Conservation International programs, an esteemed public speaker, and a recipient of multiple internationally recognized awards for her photography. In 2016, Cristina received the Imaging Award for Photographers who Give Back and in 2018 was acknowledged as a National Geographic Adventurer of the Year.

She is the editor of 26 conservation photography books and her Fine Art Coffee Table book, Amaze, is in its second printing.

Today, Cristina is the Co-founder of the conservation society, SeaLegacy, a National Geographic contributing photographer, a Sony Artisan of Imagery and the editor of 26 coffee table books on conservation issues. She is the first female photographer to reach 1M followers on Instagram and was a 2018 National Geographic Adventurer of the Year. She is acknowledged as one of the most Influential Women in Ocean Conservation in 2018 by Ocean Geographic, and The Men’s Journal recently named her as one of the 18 Most Adventurous Women in the World.

Cristina is a pioneer in the use of powerful and emotive imagery to propel conservation efforts. Born in Mexico, Cristina is a marine biologist, photographer, and writer who specializes in issues surrounding fisheries and indigenous cultures.

Cindy Crawford, 55, shows off her age-defying supermodel figure as she slips back into her denim hotpants to recreate her iconic 1992 Pepsi ad

  • Supermodel Cindy made her first appearance in a Pepsi TV commercial during the 1992 Super Bowl
  • The original featured Cindy wearing a white tank top and blue jean shorts with big hoop earrings on
  • She was driving a Lamborghini and then stops at a gas station for a can of soda which she sucks down
  • And then in 2002 she was asked to appear in a very similar ad, this time for Diet Pepsi  
  • Cindy recreated the iconic ad to raise funds for the American Family Children's Hospital in Madison, where her late brother was treated for leukemia
  • Tragically, Jeffery died of childhood leukemia when he was three-years-old


Cindy Crawford lived up to her supermodel status as she slipped back into a white tank top and her blue denim Daisy Duke shorts to recreate her iconic 1992 Pepsi Super Bowl ad.

Taking to Instagram on Tuesday, the catwalk queen, 55, showed off her age-defying figure in the photoshoot, taken by photographer David Yarrow, to raise funds for the American Family Children’s Hospital in Madison, Wisconsin, where her late brother Jeff was treated for leukemia.

Posing by a red vintage car, Cindy wowed as she once again donned silver hoop earrings and styled her hair into a big bouncy blow out.

Super Cindy: Cindy Crawford lived up to her supermodel status as she slipped back into a white tank top and her blue denim Daisy Duke shorts to recreate her iconic 1992 Pepsi Super Bowl ad

The shoot was set at the Halfway House Cafe, where Cindy shot the famous commercial. Two wolves sat in the retro supercar as Cindy fuelled up on gas.

Crawford shared what the new Pepsi experience was like. ‘It’s always a pleasure and a thrill to work with my friend @davidyarrow,’ began the Versace model.

Wow: Taking to Instagram on Tuesday, the catwalk queen, 55, showed off her age-defying figure in the photoshoot, taken by photographer David Yarrow, to raise funds for the American Family Children’s Hospital in Madison, Wisconsin

Strike a pose: Slipping into a pair of red stiletto heels, Cindy looked just as good as she did in 1992 as she displayed toned arms, long legs and very small waistline in the tiny shorts and low-scoop vest

Her pack: The shoot was set at the Halfway House Cafe, where Cindy shot the famous commercial. Two wolves sat in the retro supercar as Cindy fuelled up on gas

‘And even more so when it’s for a good cause. We returned back to the original Halfway House from the famous @pepsi commercial I did in 1992 to recreate the moment (with a David Yarrow twist) in hopes of raising funds for the American Family Children’s Hospital in Madison Wisconsin where my brother was treated for leukemia.’

Crawford was born in DeKalb, Illinois, and raised with her two sisters, Chris and Danielle. Their brother Jeffery died of childhood leukemia at age three.

Cindy continued: ‘So far, with the help of David’s gallery network across the globe supporting the art and its sales — we’ve already raised 1 million dollars for the cause.’

Important cause: Crawford wants to raise funds to help the hospital where her late brother Jeffery was treated for childhood leukemia. He tragically died aged three

She is generous: Crawford shared what the new Pepsi experience was like. ‘It’s always a pleasure and a thrill to work with my friend @davidyarrow,’ began the Versace model

Close to her heart: ‘And even more so when it’s for a good cause. We returned back to the original Halfway House from the famous @pepsi commercial I did in 1992 to recreate the moment (with a David Yarrow twist) in hopes of raising funds’

Devastating: Crawford (right) was born in DeKalb, Illinois, and raised with her two sisters, Chris and Danielle. The family tragically lost their brother Jeff when he was three

She then credited the members of her glam squad.

‘I also have to thank my dear friend, hairstylist @peter.savic who did the iconic hair for the original commercial… so i was thrilled he was able to be here for this version as well!’ said the wife of Rande Gerber.

‘Thanks also to @samvissermakeup for makeup and @allowitzstyles for styling. I think we nailed it! Such a fun day –– I can’t wait to show you more. More on stories xo.’

Stars praised her move. Reese Witherspoon said, ‘Truly gorgeous ! And for a great cause ❤️.’ Helena Christensen said, ‘❤️cool in every way.’

Thrice before: Cindy seen far left in 1992, then in another ad in 2002 and on the far right she is seen in 2018

The winner? Some say that Cindy looked her very best in the original 1992 ad while others prefer a more mature Crawford

The winner? Some say that Cindy looked her very best in the original 1992 ad while others prefer a more mature Crawford

The original featured Crawford in a tank top and jean shorts – made from her own jeans she brought to the set that day – driving a Lamborghini and stopping at a rural gas station to buy a can of soda.

Two young boys in a nearby field can be seen watching on in awe and amazement as the beauty guzzles the can in one go.

‘It was one of those moments in my career that when I walked down the street, people were like, “Pepsi!” Or I’d be at a bar and people would send me over a Pepsi,’ Crawford said, laughing. ‘And it’s funny because during Halloween a lot of women will dress up as me in that commercial. It’s like an easy Halloween costume.’

In the 2018 ad she was with her son Presley Walker Gerber who was a teen at the time.

Crawford also appeared in an an ad for Diet Pepsi in 2002, where she drove to the same gas station, this time dressed in a tight white blouse and jean shorts, driving a white Jeep.

Crawford’s modeling talents have not only extended to her son – her daughter, Kaia Jordan Gerber, is also a top model.

What are the symptoms of leukaemia in children?

Fatigue and pale skin – this is because leukaemia can cause anaemia which makes a child feel weak, tired and light-headed.

Infections and fever – children with leukaemia lack normal white blood cells which would normally help fight infection.

Rash – children may have small, dark spots that look like common rashes if the leukemia cells spread to the skin

Easy bruising or bleeding – this includes frequent nosebleeds, bleeding gums and bleeding a lot from small cuts.

Bone or joint pain – this is caused by a build up of leukaemia cells near the surface of the bone or inside the joint.

Swelling of the abdomen – leukaemia cells may collect in the liver and spleen causing them to enlarge.

Loss of appetite and weight loss – if the spleen and liver swell, they can press against the stomach causing loss of appetite.

Swollen lymph nodes – some leukaemias spread to the lymph nodes causing them to swell.

Source: American Cancer Society

The ad on the back of a bus: Here the ad i seen for the David Yarrow show which runs until November 6, 2021